Green Jobs

With the growth of green building standards, the future of green jobs looks bright. But once you’re LEED accredited, the journey is just beginning.

State of Green Jobs

So you’ve got your LEED credential and you’re ready to go set the green job market on fire...with sustainability.

But what’s next? How do you actually take that hard-earned LEED credential and put it to good use?

Well to do that, you need to understand the broader scope of the market you’re trying enter. You keep hearing that the green industry is on the rise, but you need to know what that actually means. It helps to understand the overall market development.

From there, you need to know what the “green industry” actually is and how to find and get a green job itself.

Of course, understanding some of the subtler nuances of the green job market won’t really help you much if you don’t know the specifics of the different fields and applications of that market, now will it? That’s why we’ve gone through each LEED project certifying criteria and compiled a comprehensive (but by no means exhaustive) list of professions within the green jobs market.

And, if you’re not necessarily in a green job field or you want to know where the ceiling is, we’ve provided a list of ancillary, executive, and general positions with descriptions to help you see where you might still fit within the green jobs market or where you might reach as you pursue advancement within your field.

Green MBA GuideWith most Fortune 200 companies using the LEED standard and committing to sustainable design, it is in everyone’s best interest (both theirs and yours), for you to understand the green jobs market and how to best position yourself within it.

The growing number of green jobs and an increasing corporate commitment to sustainability has also inspired colleges and universities to offer Green Masters of Business Administration (“Green MBA”) programs. Green MBA programs prepare professionals to manage for the “triple bottom line” of “people, planet, profit”. Green MBAs not only manage for financial success and worker productivity, but also for sustainability.

Demand for Green MBA graduates continues to grow as companies continue to gain awareness of environmental issues and realize the financial and social benefits of sustainability. Companies will need qualified, informed professionals to incorporate sustainability into their business - and Green MBAs will fit the bill.

The Green Job Market Now and into the Future

The Green Industry covers diverse arenas from construction to product development to operating procedures. Of course, this can be somewhat misleading as there is no global standard for what constitutes a green project (though, different third-party entities have done so within various fields).

Fortune 500, Flickr

However, the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics assumes those projects are linked to preserving or restoring the environment. Broadly speaking, green jobs protect the environment, conserve energy and/or natural resources, mitigate climate change, and/or contributes to providing energy security. As the green industry grows, many positions have already incorporated more than one goal within its scope.

With so much ambiguity this can mean opportunity or frustration for those seeking to find employment within this burgeoning industry. Primarily, if there is not set global agreement on what qualifies as a “green job,” what does one look for when searching for one, and what qualifications should one seek to obtain a green job?

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), a non-profit group composed of over 60 different organizations spearheads the effort not only to advance the creation and acceptance of the green building industry but also to standardize the practices and certifications of what actually qualifies as a “green building.”

LEEDing Standards

Having developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification program to set baseline standards for what can officially be labeled as green building development (under USGBC’s third-party organization as there are other green project certifying bodies), USGBC also conducts research on the green industry’s trends as well as its future.  

USGBC, Flickr

Recently, USGBC conducted a survey identify how green industry leaders were responding to efforts to standardize the requirements and qualifications of green building projects and green professionals. Within hundreds of subsidiary industries surveyed, 91 percent of employers would recommend their peers become LEED accredited with 71 percent of those surveyed suggesting that they would make LEED credentials a requirement for employment in the future.

A study conducted by USGBC found that over a year-long period between March 2013 to February 2014,  LEED credential postings increased by 46 percent to over 9,000 positions. A follow up study examining the first quarter of 2014 found 2,354 green building positions with LEED credentials being a requirement for 59 percent of them. The next most requested skill was found in only 17 percent of the positions.

With growing acknowledgement and acceptance of not only green building practices but standardization by LEED certification, the growth of green industry employment is only expected to rise. However, not all green jobs are treated equally, as per the report conducted by Iowa State University, construction and renovation of industrial, commercial and residential buildings are likely to lead the way for green job growth.

Rapid Growth of Green Jobs

In 2006, Global Insight studied the (then) current statistics of green industry jobs and found nearly three quarters of the positions to be held by individuals who would benefit from or need accreditation by a third-party green standards organization like USGBC.

With a total employment of less than a million, actually a little over 750,000, Global Insight projected there would be roughly 3.3 million green industry jobs by 2018. That projection had already been overtaken and expanded upon by 2013 which saw 3.4 million green jobs domestically.

World-wide there were 6.5 million green jobs created by 2013. Unfortunately, due to sequestration and the government shutdown, The Bureau of Labor and Statistics was forced to cut its Green Careers program which studied the green job market.

Environmental Entrepreneurs put together a study called Clean Jobs America in which they analyzed the growth of just the clean energy field. This ignores the wealth of opportunity that lay for LEED accredited individuals to find employment related to the Location and Transportation, Sustainable Site, Water Efficiency, Materials and Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality, Innovation, or Regional Priority sections of the LEED certification rating system.

Just within the purview of the clean energy field, more than 2.5 million Americans are employed in diverse fields related to clean energy like energy efficiency, renewable energy, and green vehicles, and that number expected to grow in the coming years. This means that even within the specialized field of clean energy there are numerous outlets for a variety disciplines to find gainful, sustained employment.

So when seeking out a green job, your search should not merely focus on the position, your personal qualifications, and the company. You would do well to narrow the parameters of your search by region as well.  For instance, The West Coast, Great Lakes Area, and Northeast have more current green industry development that other areas in the U.S. While California and Minnesota lead the country in providing state-sponsored renewable initiatives.

Green Job Title Categories: Nuance and Scope

Keep in mind when applying for a green job or with a green company that different titles have different responsibilities. While this may seem obvious, the tasks associated with each title may not be obvious at all.

Some of the job titles below may seem silly, designed more to catch the eye of a Public Relations company than a hiring manager, but others are some of the fast rising, most lucrative, or interesting jobs in the green market today.

Green Energy Czar: This is the title that Google gives its Chief Sustainability Officer. You have to give points for originality, but this may not be the route for everybody. First, there is the vague despotic, Russian title of Czar. While this title is more commonly associated with heads of bureaucratic institutions in the government, it does provide a whimsical sense of authority.

Green Giant: This is the title for Method’s environmental strategist. Again, another title that gets high marks for originality, you have to appreciate the wry humor of a well-placed pun. Not actually a salesperson of canned and bagged vegetables, this is just one of a variety of unique and humorous titles used by the company that prides itself with coming up with inventive titles for its professional employees.

Chief Inspired Protagonist: This is a title that while likely to turn some heads, may be a too bit vague for all but executive positions or companies that seek to make a statement. Just from the name, you might suspect that a chief inspired protagonist is the main character of an uplifting, feel-good movie. But no, it’s the executive chairperson for Seventh Generation, an eco-friendly household and personal care company.

Sustainability Ambassador: This is the first of the “unusual” titles that 1) can likely be used in a variety of companies and 2) give everyone else a much better idea of what that person immediately does. This is also the second title which has association with a traditionally governmental bureaucratic association. However, this position functions like a hybrid between a consultant and a public relations person, spreading the benefits of sustainability to audiences that may either not be familiar with the principles or reluctant to accept the cost of investment.

Green Job Employee, Pixabay

Civil Engineer: This is one of the most versatile positions within the green building jobs market, because it has applications within a variety of LEED certification categories. From Location and Transportation to Sustainable Sites to Water Efficiency and more, the civil engineer will find tasks that they are qualified for whether it’s analyzing data for local traffic, test building materials, calculate the costs for supplies and materials, identify, and if need be apply, local or federal regulations and permits, the civil engineer can find tasks to do at every step along the process in most of the certifying criteria. They also earn a pretty respectable almost $78000 per year on average

Atmospheric and space scientists: This job might seem a bit specific, but it too has a broad application within LEED certifying projects. For instance, within the energy and atmosphere category, almost certainly a necessity will be to determine what the best position of the solar panels to receive the most sunlight will be. These scientists will conduct some studies and analyse the data to provide the best position, the proper angles, and potentially troubleshoot potential environmental factors--like if you are in the U.S. Pacific northwest. Possibly because of their specialization, if not their outright utility, these scientists earn even more than civil engineers with close to a comfortable $90000 per year average.

Natural sciences managers: Other than Chief Sustainability Officers--an executive level position--this job earns one of the highest average salaries per year in the green jobs market with almost a healthy $115,000. However, this position is a bit of a hybrid like the sustainability ambassador, except this job will work directly on LEED certifying projects. Of course, as the title suggests, this person is actually in charge of a project team and will coordinate the findings of the different scientists with the other teams or their leaders including the project manager, the engineering teams, and the consultants.

Green Jobs by LEED Category

One of the difficulties for any developing industry is definition and standardization. As we have already observed, determining what actually qualifies as a green job or a green project is fraught with disagreement and ambiguity. This lack of specificity then necessarily LEEDs into the labels applied to those positions within such an ill-defined industry.

As such, many positions within green industries are either defined as other positions with a focus on sustainability or, quite often, are defined by the individual seeking the position. This means it may very well fall on your shoulders to not only identify the position for which you seek but to actually define it for your employer as well.

In time, as USGBC continues to refine the process by which LEED credentials and certifications are awarded, there may emerge an “industry standard” that future applicants will use or search for when seeking employment within green industries. Until such time however, you should be prepared to analyze your scope of knowledge and skills to provide your potential employer with an appropriate title for your potential position.

It may seem a bit cynical, but simply placing “sustainability” in front of an already established title within the industry seems to be a common practice. And assuming you can support the claim, there seems to be little harm in doing so.

Fields and Specialties

When selecting a potential LEED category to specialize in, keep in mind many fields and positions can wear multiple hats in LEED certified projects. This means different areas may require the same position (though this does not necessarily mean the same person will do both jobs).

For example, a soil scientist may be required to satisfy certifying points for a LEED project in both the Location and Transportation section as well as the Sustainable Sites section. To point, a soil scientist may be brought in to study the soil of the surrounding region to determine whether the project qualifies for option three, brownfield remediation, under the High-Priority Site section of the Location and Transportation.

Likewise, the same or a different soil scientist (depending on the scale of project) would be used to study the soil for both the Environmental Site Assessment and General Site Assessment under the Sustainable Site section.

However, depending on the project’s size, zone, and time table, it may be in the project’s best interest to have two or more soil scientists to work on each section. Of course, if the project permits, a single soil scientist may certify both the Location and Transportation as well as the Sustainable Sites requirements.

Location and Transportation (LT)

Points towards a project’s LEED certification in the LT category are determined by decisions regarding building location. These decisions focus of compact design, types of transportation, and connection with amenities. LT seeks to advocate for sustainability by utilizing existing infrastructure and utilities, while accommodating land density and previous development--especially if in a blighted, contaminated, or otherwise Difficult Development Area (DDA).

Proper building integration also prevents the cost--both financial and environmental--of building new utility connections. At the beginning of a project, LT will need professions that analyze foot and vehicle traffic--with special attention paid to public transit, the environmental viability of the local land, the regional density of population and structures,

With land-use measures able to cut 9-15% of transportation greenhouse emissions by 2050, LT offers an excellent return for sustainable design. This reduction can be fostered by sites encouraging walking, bicycle use with storage and a developed bicycle network, proximity to mass transit, or parking and charging for green vehicles while limiting the amount of private parking available with help from a transportation demand parking strategy.

Moreover, proper land-use can further cut down on the total project cost since additional infrastructure will not have to be built. Each parking space alone costs about $15000. However, jobs associated with LT do not truly seek to focus on on-site measures which is the scope allotted to Sustainable Sites.

Some positions which are relevant to LT include:

  • Urban Development Planner
  • Regional Development Planner
  • Land-Use Planner
  • Resource Manager
  • Civil Engineer
  • Drainage Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Soil Scientist
  • Wildlife Biologist
  • Ecologist
  • Hydrologist
  • Geologist
  • Climatologist
  • Biologist
  • Arborist
  • Botanist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Landscape Architect
  • Earthworks Contractor
  • Transportation/Transit Analyst
  • Graphic Informations Systems (GIS) Analyst
  • Remediation Specialist
  • Wetlands Specialist
  • Historic Site Commissioner

Sustainable Sites (SS)

Lumsden Green Construction Site's Hole, Wikimedia

The Sustainable Sites (SS) category rewards project compliance with LEED prerequisites and credits that protect the natural environment surrounding the building.

Requirements within SS include controlling construction-related pollution and conducting an environmental site assessment to prevent or remediating any contamination.

The SS category awards points for preserving and restoring natural project site elements, preserving natural habitats, protecting biodiversity and avoiding disruption of local and regional ecosystems.

Sustainable Sites also contemplates the protection of open space, water bodies and minimizing impermeable hardscapes. Low impact strategies in the SS category also include minimizing light pollution, reducing the heat island effect and managing stormwater runoff.

Some positions which are relevant to SS include:

  • Civil Engineer
  • Waste Management Engineer
  • Drainage Engineer
  • Water Resource Engineer
  • Stormwater Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Illumination Engineer
  • Lighting Designer
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Soil Scientist
  • Wildlife Biologist
  • Ecologist
  • Arborist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Botanist
  • Biologist
  • Climatologist
  • Geologist
  • Hydrologist
  • Wetlands Specialist
  • Landscape Architect
  • Earthworks Contractor
  • Landscape Designer
  • Horticulturalist
  • Remediation Specialist
  • Resource Manager
  • Haz-Mat Technician
  • Land-Use Planner
  • Solar Engineer
  • Solar Technician
  • Solar Roofer
  • Historic Site Commissioner

Water Efficiency (WE)

Water Efficiency may not be the largest sector of green jobs related to LEED certification, but it is one of the fastest growing. WE focuses explicitly on water use and how to ensure that a project utilizes water use most efficiently while minimizing water use as much as possible.

This goal is achieved with a multi-prong approach that examines indoor and outdoor water use, specialized water use, and water metering. WE utilizes techniques like  recycling wastewater, planting native drought-resistant vegetation with good landscaping design, efficient plumbing fitting, and installing WaterSense efficient fixtures to minimize water use.

To ensure efficiency standards are maintained, metering and submetering systems are employed and monitored--ideally self-reporting. Furthermore, a detailed accounting of manufacturer’s information for fixtures and fitting  as well as identifying all potable water end uses help ensure the efficiency standards are met.

Passive irrigation techniques and rainwater collection in conjunction with good landscape design are also used to limit water use. WE also handles cooling tower or condenser systems to ensure they meet blowdown cycle efficiency standards as well as water discharge temperature standards.

Some positions which are relevant to WE include:

  • Civil Engineer
  • Hydraulic Engineer
  • Plumbing Engineer
  • Drainage Engineer
  • Stormwater Engineer
  • Wastewater Engineer
  • Remediation Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Water Efficiency Specialist
  • Water Conservation Specialist
  • Waste Management Specialist
  • Wetlands Specialist
  • Landscape Architect
  • Land-Use Planner
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Atmospheric Scientist
  • Hydrologist
  • Ecologist
  • Arborist
  • Botanist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Geologist
  • Earthworks Contractor
  • Irrigation Technician
  • Resource Manager
  • Appliance Acquisition

Commercial Solar Array, Wikimedia

Energy and Atmosphere (EA)

According to the United Nations Environment Programme, buildings in the United States are responsible for 40% of our total energy consumption. For this reason, the LEED Energy & Atmosphere Category is potentially the most influential not only in terms of the number of points that can be earned in LEED, but also because of impact on energy efficiency, renewable energy and energy use reduction.

Green jobs in the EA category are on the front lines of our transition toward sustainable, renewable energies, and away from fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and natural gas. From the initial stages of building design to operations and maintenance, performance in the EA category is influenced by professions influencing a building's orientation, glazing selection, building envelope design, passive heating and cooling, operable window design, high efficiency HVAC systems, building controls, green power, demand response programs and on-site renewable energy systems.

Project teams engage a commissioning agent (CxA) early in the design process to meet the owner's operational needs and the design intent. Commissioning is both a prerequisite (required) for Fundamental Commissioning and Verification in LEED certification, and a credit (optional) to earn more points through greater efficiencies with "Enhanced Commissioning".

To forecast building energy use and predict efficiency, project teams working in EA may employ energy modeling to predict Minimum Energy Performance in line with ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2007 (or USGBC approved equivalent) standards as well as further optimizing energy performance through load reduction, improved mechanical efficiency and smart operational strategies. EA credits also address refrigerant management and carbon offset strategies.

Some positions which are relevant to AE include:

  • Commissioner (Cx) [Energy, HVAC&R, Plumbing, Mechanical, Electrical]
  • Civil Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Structural Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Systems Engineer
  • Materials Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Energy Process Engineer
  • Energy Operational Engineer
  • HVAC Engineer
  • Building Envelope Engineer
  • Insulation Engineer
  • Refrigeration Engineer
  • Illumination Engineer
  • Solar Engineer
  • Solar Technician
  • Solar Roofer
  • Energy Manager
  • Energy Modeler
  • Air Quality Specialist
  • Interior Designer
  • Lighting Designer
  • Climate Scientist
  • Ecologist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Botanist
  • Incineration Chemist

Materials and Resources (MR)

Materials and Resources are all about the “meat” of the project. Where do the materials used in project originate? Are they recycled? Are they toxic? What was the environmental cost of their production and transportation?

MR also manages the waste generated during construction of a new project or demolition of an existing structure (and whether or not those materials can be salvaged or recycled). With 40% of total solid waste stream in the US constituted by construction and demolition, this is an important step in sustainable design and construction.

Source reduction, reuse, recycling, and waste to energy are the EPA’s four preferred strategies for reducing solid waste. Use of prefabricated materials through innovative construction strategies minimizes material cutoffs and inefficiencies.

Other factors MR manages is the construction materials and whether they contain persistent organic pollutants (POPs) or various persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) chemicals like mercury, cadmium, copper, or lead.

Furthermore, MR ensures that the materials are not only environmentally sound at the outset with environmental product declarations (EPD) but that the environmental imprint of their production, transportation, and manufacture. With EPD, the materials are not only examined as a whole, but also as their constituent parts. Thus, a prefabricated wall with metal and wood would have to declare for both materials.

This analysis isn’t restricted to just the project’s beginning as a life-cycle assessment (LCA) determines the projects material impact over time too. Responsibly harvested wood, bio-based materials, and increased recycled content all contribute to high life-cycle standards. LCA also includes the maintenance, process, and transport needs--sometimes called “cradle to grave” or “cradle to cradle” approaches.

This will become increasingly important as LCA and EPDs become mandatory and will likely create niche jobs within the field. As these requirements evolve, the need for dedicated researchers, analysts, and those who can verify a product’s origin and content will increase.

Some positions which are relevant to MR include:

  • Materials Manager
  • Civil Engineer
  • Structural Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Process Engineer
  • Building Envelope Engineer
  • Insulation Engineer
  • Plumbing Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Incineration Chemist
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Environmental Consultant
  • Sustainability Analyst
  • Raw Materials Sourcer
  • Metallurgist
  • Ecologist
  • Interior Designer
  • Haz-Mat Technician
  • Waste Management Specialist
  • Recycling Specialist
  • Logistics Specialist
  • Masonry Specialist
  • Carpentry Specialist
  • Contractor
  • Construction Coordinator
  • Historic Site Commissioner
  • Furnishing Acquisition

Green Interior Design, Wikimedia

Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ)

Indoor Environmental Quality seeks to address the health and wellbeing of the project’s eventual occupants. These requirements involve such seemingly disparate qualities as thermal comfort, air quality before and after construction, acoustic quality, lighting, low-emitting materials, standard ventilation--both passive and mechanical, and quality views.

Air quality standards are determined by ASHRAE 62.1-2010/CEN/EN 13779-2007 whether mechanically or naturally ventilated to measure outdoor air intake, exhaust airflow measurement, and CO2 concentration monitoring. These standards are further reinforced by developing an SMACNA IAQ plan, passive design ventilation, air filtration, entry-way systems, and control of tobacco use on the project’s property.

Low-emitting materials are tested and certified to control volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for paints, flooring, ceiling, walls, composite wood, furniture, and adhesives and sealants. These materials must qualify as low-emitting under the CDPH SM V1.1–2010, ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1–2011, CARB 93120 ATCM, or the applicable wet-applied standards.

Thermal comfort is determined by ASHRAE Standard 55–2010, ISO 7730:2005, or CEN Standard EN 15251:2007 to provide the most satisfying experience for occupants and improve their performance taking into consideration air temperature, humidity, surface temperature, air movement, metabolic rate, and clothing.

A focus on lighting covers a wide variety of topics such as glare minimization, individual group control, and incorporating natural light to reinforce the circadian rhythm. This last point will also affect the availability of quality views which must also account for multiple lines of sight, flora, fauna, the sky, movement, and distance of view.

Acoustic control seeks to minimize noise from HVAC, between different project spaces, reverberation and exterior noise from distracting the building’s occupants. Other factors EQ considers are various space-uses, whether it’s floor plans, density, or occupancy.

While many of the other sections ideally maximize or minimize the impacts of their scope as appropriate, EQ seeks to strike a balance between the project’s eventual occupants and the goals of sustainability.

Some positions which are relevant to EQ include:

  • Civil Engineer
  • Structural Engineer
  • Process Engineer
  • Systems Engineer
  • Materials Engineer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Illumination Engineer
  • Acoustic Engineer
  • HVAC Engineer
  • Plumbing Engineer
  • Insulation Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Energy Engineer
  • Energy Manager
  • Materials Manager
  • Raw Materials Sourcer
  • Space Planner
  • Interior Designer
  • Lighting Designer
  • Contractor
  • Construction Coordinator
  • Furnishing Acquisition
  • Appliance Acquisition
  • Furnishing Acquisition
  • Air Quality Specialist
  • Masonry Specialist
  • Carpentry Specialist
  • Bio-Thermal Scientist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Botanist
  • Arborist

Innovation (IN)

Innovation can be looked at in two different ways. First, it can be seen as an enticement to tempt LEED projects towards using new and exciting measures that do not necessarily have the same tried-and-true track record of other more established practices and techniques.

However, as per the LEED Reference Guide for Building Design and Construction v4 notes, it is also a bit of a catch-all category for any additional sustainable design that is not explicitly covered. These innovations can also be met by piloting an innovation or achieving exemplary performance.

Furthermore, IN seeks to advocate further adoption and implementation of LEED credentialing and sustainable design by rewarding projects that hire LEED accredited team members. In this way, IN allows LEED certification to be forward-thinking and reward continued progress and the courage required to implement an otherwise undesignated sustainable improvement.

Some positions which are relevant to IN include:

  • LEED Accredited Professional
  • Futurist
  • Technologist
  • Design Analyst
  • Research Analyst
  • Innovation Leader/Manager/Consultant/Specialist
  • Cross-Disciplinary

Regional Priority (RP)

Much like Innovation seeks to allow exceptions of inclusion in regards to technique for the purposes of LEED certification, Regional Priority provides the same flexibility in regards to a project’s specific location. Because a project in the desert will inherently have different advantages and limitations than one, say, in a major urban metropolis, USGBC recognized the necessity in allowing a round hole to adjust to fit a square peg, so to speak.

Under this premise, projects that take extra care and plan exceptionally well may earn additional points towards other rubrics if those sustainable needs are deemed a regional priority. Factors as diverse as climate, regional contamination, population density, and local regulation.

Achieving points in RP demonstrates not only a commitment to green design, but appreciation for how sustainability issues differ from place to place as well.

Some positions which are relevant to RP include:

  • Civil Engineer
  • Illumination Engineer
  • Drainage Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Environmental Consultant
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Urban Development Planner
  • Regional Development Planner
  • Land-Use Planner
  • Resource Manager
  • Landscape Architect
  • Earthworks Contractor
  • Wildlife Biologist
  • Wetlands Specialist
  • Soil Scientist
  • Geologist
  • Hydrologist
  • Ecologist
  • Arborist
  • Horticulturalist
  • Botanist
  • Biologist
  • Climatologist
  • Transportation/Transit Analyst
  • Graphic Informations Systems (GIS) Analyst
  • Remediation Specialist
  • Logistics Specialist
  • Lighting Designer
  • Historic Site Commissioner

The Next Big Thing

As you can see, the green industry is an exciting and diverse field with opportunity for people from a range of disciplines, with a variety of interests and experiences. Yet, as time goes on, the industry will inevitably stabilize.

We already see this process occurring with the continued development of the LEED certification, its acceptance within green industry, and its potential necessity in the future. Before too long, it may well be required that most professionals within the green industry job market are in some way shape or form LEED accredited.

But with continued industry growth both in the U.S. and abroad, green industry seems not only likely to stay but to boom in the coming years. As more countries begin to take serious the threat of climate change and the need for sustainable policy, green industry’s future only looks brighter.

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