Location and Transportation

Take an in-depth look at LEED’s Location and Transportation feature which focuses on building location and its connection to local businesses and transportation.

Overview

The Location and Transportation (LT) is an extension of the Sustainable Sites category, which formerly covered location-related topics. Location and Transportation efficiency refers to thoughtful decisions about building location with credits that encourage compact development, alternative transportation and connection with existing amenities in the area.

Buildings that use the Location and Transportation category feature public transit, street networks, pedestrian paths, bicycle networks, services and amenities and existing utilities. The LT credit encourages active lifestyles and helps to reduce the strain automobiles puts on the environment by making sure every building provides on-site services required for some form of active transportation.

The LT credit supports the building owner. For owners, proximity to existing utility lines and street networks avoids the cost of bringing this infrastructure to the project site. This can greatly reduce building construction time and costs. Additionally, LT buildings are built for accessibility. This means that buildings, such as malls or shops, have the potential of having more occupants and making more money overall.

The LT credit also supports the occupant. By making sure buildings have the necessary amenities for bikers, runners, walkers, etc; occupants can enjoy a healthy lifestyle on their commute. Occupants with busy schedules will not have to feel guilty about “not having time for the gym” anymore because going to work every day will be their workout.
That being said, LT credit fulfilling buildings are accessible for those who want to take it easier. Being located in a vibrant, livable community makes the building a destination for residents, employees, customers and visitors. Also, the building’s occupants will contribute to the area’s economic activity, creating a good model for future development.

The Location and Transportation credit has 8 features:

1. LEED for Neighborhood Development
2. LEED for Sensitive Land Protection
3. LEED for High-Priority Site
4. LEED for Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses
5. LEED for Access to Quality Transit
6. LEED for Bicycle Facilities
7. LEED for Reduced Parking Footprint
8. LEED for Green Vehicles

These features include in-depth definitions of how to handle each category listed to fulfill the Location and Transportation credit fully. Now that we have all the credits lined up, we can take a closer look at what each of these individual credits feature.

(1) LEED for Neighborhood Development Location Feature

The first on our list of features under the LT credit is LEED for Neighborhood Development Location. The goal of this feature is to “avoid development in inappropriate sites, to reduce vehicles miles traveled, to enhance livability and improve human health by encouraging daily physical activity.”

This credit applies to:

  • New Construction (8-16 points)
  • Core and Shell (8-20 points)
  • Schools (8-15 points)
  • Retail (8-16 points)
  • Data Centers (8-16 points)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (8-16 points)
  • Hospitality (8-16 points)
  • Healthcare (5-9 points)

Those looking to fulfill the Neighborhood Development Location feature must follow this process.

 Alex Mihis, Pexels

STEP ONE: Identify LEED ND (LEED for Neighborhood Development) or certified plan area for potential development. This means that candidates must find a plan site that makes sense and is appropriate for the type of building. Buildings must be located fully within a LEED ND-certified neighborhood or certified plan area. 

You can check the USGBC website for an updated list of LEED ND projects and planning spaces.

STEP TWO: Confirm eligibility of LEED ND project. To do this, research the following information on your chosen ND project site:

  • Rating system and rating system version of the project site
  • Certification designation
  • Certification level and certification date

STEP THREE: Decide what points are available for LEED ND Location credit and which points are available for individual LT credits. Realize which points are achievable for the LEED ND Location credit and which could be applied instead to a broader range of credits.

STEP FOUR: Once you have determined which points you can achieve through this credit, decide on a final credit achievement pathway. It is important to note that projects determined to achieve the LEED for ND Location credit are not eligible to pursue any other Location and Transportation credits. In other words, pick which credit you would like your project to fulfill and stick with it!

Be smart with choosing which credit you would like your project to pursue. If you have several potential points for the LEED ND Location credit it would make sense to pursue this credit. Likewise, if you find that you only have 6 eligible points for LEED ND Location but have 15 for another LEED LT credit, perhaps you should choose to pursue the latter.

STEP FIVE: This is the last step, (phew!). Collect and confirm LEED ND project information. The following information is required:

  • Project name and ID number
  • Map of certified LEED ND neighborhood or plan boundary

That’s it! By following these five steps you can decided if your project is eligible for pursuing the LEED ND Location credit. If you would like more explanation, the LEED BD+C Guide PDF provides further information on the LEED ND Location credit on page 72.

Now, let’s move on to the next credit, Sensitive Land Protection.

(2) LEED for Sensitive Land Protection Feature

The Sensitive Land Protection feature is in place to avoid the overdevelopment of environmentally sensitive lands and to reduce the environmental impact from the location of a building site. This may most readily help with endangered plants and wildlife species that may be affected with the construction of a new building. 

This credit can be applied to:

  • New Construction (1 point)
  • Core and Shell (2 points)
  • Schools (1 point)
  • Retail (1 point)
  • Data Centers (1 point)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1 point)
  • Hospitality (1 point)
  • Healthcare (1 point)

There are two options to fulfill this credit:
Option 1: Locate the development footprint on previously developed land. 

Pexels

By essentially recycling developed land, projects take up no more space than has already been used in the past. This is more easily achieved in urban areas but can also be achieved in any other site that has been used before.

Option 2: Locate the development footprint on land that does not meet the criteria for “sensitive land”.

This is self-explanatory. You can use the guides provided by LEED to determine if the project site is deemed sensitive land. Examples of sensitive land are:

  • Prime farmland. Prime farmland or farmland of statewide or local importance as defined by The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations can not be built on.
  • Floodplains. This one is self-explanatory. Building on land that has been recorded as floodplains is not a good idea as you run risk of unstable land and flood risks.
  • Habitat. Any land that is identified as natural habitat for threatened, endangered, or under the U.S. Endangered Species Act is strictly forbidden for new construction.
  • Water Bodies. Building sites within 100 feet of a water body are off limits.
  • Wetlands. Areas on or within 50 feet of a wetland cannot be built on.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit must follow the processes listed in the LEED BD+C PDF on pages 75-76.

(3) LEED for High Priority Site Feature

The LEED for High Priority Site feature is designed to encourage projects to be located in areas with development constraints to benefit the health of the surrounding region. This will help not only the land that the building is directly built on, but also the entire surrounding area. There are three options for potential projects to fulfill this feature.

This feature can be applied to:

  • New Construction (1-2 points)
  • Core and Shell (2-3 points)
  • Schools (1-2 points)
  • Retails (1-2 points)
  • Data Centers (1-2 points)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1-2 points
  • Hospitality (1-2 points)
  • Healthcare (1-2 points)

In order to fulfill this LT feature, projects can choose from three different options.
Option 1: Historic District (1 point BD + C, 2 points Core and Shell)

Projects can be located on an infill location within a historic district to meet the High Priority Site feature.

Option 2: Priority Designation (1 point BD + C, 2 points Core and Shell)
By choosing option 2, you have many more options of where to build. Projects can be built on sites listed by (1) the EPA National Priorities List, (2) Federal Empowerment Zone sites, (3) Federal Enterprise Community sites, (4) a Federal Renewal Community site, (5) a Department of the Treasury Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Qualified Low-Income
Community, (6) a site in a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Qualified Census Tract (QCT) or Difficult Development Area (DDA), or (7) a local equivalent program administered at the national level for projects outside the U.S.

Option 3: Brownfield Remediation (2 points BD+C, 3 points Core and Shell)
Option 3 requires that you locate your project on a brownfield where soil or groundwater contamination has been identified, and where the local, state, or national authority (whichever has jurisdiction) requires its remediation. Perform remediation to the satisfaction of that authority. 

The BD+C Guide PDF states that the High Priority Site feature intends to bring environmental and socio-economic advantages to the community. By reusing lots, sensitive land can be preserved and old lots can be revitalized with new growth. If you choose to fulfill the High Priority Site feature you can contribute to the enhancement of the surrounding community environmentally and economically.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit can refer to pages 83-85 of the LEED BD+C Guide PDF for a complete step-by-step how-to explanation. 

(4) LEED for Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses

The BD+C Guide states that the Location and Transportation feature LEED for Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses intends to conserve land and protect farmland and wildlife habitat by encouraging development in areas with existing infrastructure, to promote walkability, transportation efficiency and reduce vehicle distance traveled and to improve public health by encouraging daily physical activity. 

This feature can be applied to:

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  • New Construction (1-5 points)
  • Core and shell (1-6 points)
  • Schools (1-5 points)
  • Retail (1–5 points)
  • Data Centers (1–5 points)
  • Warehouses and distribution Centers (1–5 points)
  • Hospitality (1–5 points)
  • Healthcare (1 point)

LEED breaks this feature up into three main categories of buildings.

For New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools, Retail, Data Centers and Hospitality projects, 2 options exist for fulfilling this feature.

Option 1: Surrounding Density (2-3 points BD+C, 2-4 Core and Shell)

Locate on a site whose surrounding existing density within a 1/4 mile (400-meter) radius of the project boundary meets the values in Table 1. Use either the “separate residential and nonresidential densities” or the “combined density” values.
DU = dwelling unit; FAR = floor-area ratio

Option 2: Diverse Uses (1-2 points)

Construct or renovate a building or a space within a building such that the building’s main entrance is within a 1/2 mile (800-meter) walking distance of the main entrance of four to seven (1 point) or eight or more (2 points) existing and publicly available diverse uses.

The following restrictions apply.

  • A use counts as only one type (e.g., a retail store may be counted only once even if it sells products in several categories).
  • No more than two uses in each use type may be counted.
  • The counted uses must represent at least three of the five categories, exclusive of the building’s primary use.

For Warehouses and Distribution Centers, two options exist for fulfilling this feature:

Option 1: Development and Agency (2-3 points)

Construct or renovate the project on a site that has been previously developed and an adjacent site. Adjacent sites must be used for commercial/industrial purposes.
Option 2: Transportation Resources (1-2 points)

Construct or renovate the project on a site that has two or three (1 point) or four (2 points) of the following transportation resources:

  • The site is within a 10-mile (16 kilometer) driving distance of an airport, seaport, intermodal facility, or freight village with intermodal transportation.
  • The site is within a 1-mile driving distance of an on-off ramp to a highway.
  • The site is within a 1-mile driving distance of an access point to an active freight rail line.
  • The site is served by an active freight rail spur.

In all cases, a planned transportation resource must be sited, funded, and under construction by the date of the certificate of occupancy and complete within 2 years of that date.

For Healthcare projects, 2 options exist to fulfill the Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses feature.

Option 1: Surrounding Density (1 point)

Locate your project on a site whose surrounding density is within a 1/4 mile radius of the project boundary is at least 7 housing units per acre with a 0.5 floor-area ratio and at least 22,000 square feet per acre of buildable land.

Option 2: Diverse Uses (1 point)

For this option, construct or renovate a building on a site such that the building’s main entrance is within a 1/2 mile walking distance of the main entrance of at least seven operational accessible uses.

However, these restrictions may apply:

  • A use may be counted as only one type (a retail store may be counted only once even if it has several operational entrances).
  • No more than two uses in each use type may be counted. That is that if there are a line of 5 restaurants, only two may be counted while the remaining 3 are ignored.
  • Counted uses must represent at least three of the five categories exclusive of the building’s primary use.

Locating entrances close together is useful to better the environment and social behavior. People rarely walk more than a 1/4 mile for their commute and it is certainly a-typical for a person to walk 1/2 mile for their commute. Additionally, condensing project spaces limits the length of vehicular trips and total air pollution because of the shortened trip. Air particulate levels go down along with greenhouse gas emissions, reducing transportation’s climate change effects. Furthermore, per capita pedestrian and bicycle injuries and deaths tend to be fewer in denser neighborhoods with more pedestrians and cyclists, since motorists must drive more slowly and carefully in these areas. The BD+C Guide also states that community density improves community members’ health. As neighborhoods become more compact, residents who frequently walk, bike, or use transit are more physically fit and less likely to be overweight.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit can refer to pages 90-94 of the LEED BD+C Guide PDF for a complete step-by-step how-to explanation.

(5) LEED for Access to Quality Transit Feature

LEED’s feature for Access to Quality Transit is intended to encourage development in locations shown to have multimodal transportation choices or otherwise reduced motor vehicle use, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and other environmental and public health harms associated with motor vehicle use. By utilizing public transit, significant improvements can be made to the environment and the surrounding community well-being.

This credit can be applied to:

Pexels

  • New Construction (1-5 points)
  • Core and Shell (1-6 points)
  • Schools (1-4 points)
  • Data Centers (1-5 points)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1-5 points)
  • Hospitality (1-5 points)
  • Retail (1-5 points)
  • Healthcare (1-2 points)

For New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Warehouses and Distribution Centers and Hospitality projects, this feature can be fulfilled by:

Locating any functional entry of the project within a 1/4 mile walking distance of existing or planned bus, streetcar, or ride-share stops, or within a 1/2 mile walking distance of existing or planned bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, or commuter terminals.

LEED has requirements that must be met for both weekday and weekend trips. Qualifying transit routes must have a paired route service for opposite directions. However, only trips in one direction are counted towards the qualifying transit route threshold. The BD+C Guide states that if a qualifying transit route has multiple stops within the required walking distance, only trips from one stop are counted towards the threshold.

For Schools, Access to Quality Transit can be fulfilled through two options:

OPTION 1: Transit-Served Location (1-4 points)

For option 1, projects can fulfill this feature by adhering to the same set of requirements as listed under the New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Warehouses and Distribution Centers and Hospitality projects section.

OPTION 2: Pedestrian Access (1-4 points)

Projects must have an attendance boundary such that the specified percentages of students live within no more than a 3/4 mile walking distance for students 14 and below, and 1 1/2 mile walking distance for students above 15 of any functional school entries. 

Healthcare projects can fulfill the LEED Access to Quality Transit feature by:

Healthcare projects will refer to the same set of requirements as listed for New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Warehouses and Distribution Centers, Hospitality projects and Schools.

Projects must locate any functional entry of the project within a 1/4 mile walking distance of existing or planned bus, streetcar, or ride-share stops, or within a 1/2 mile walking distance of existing or planned bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, or commuter terminals.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit can refer to pages 103-05 of the LEED BD+C Guide PDF for a complete step-by-step how-to explanation.

(6) LEED for Bicycle Facilities Feature

Under the LEED Location and Transportation credit you will find the Bicycle Facilities feature. This feature helps to promote bicycling and transportation efficiency and reduce vehicle distance traveled. LEED encourages public health by setting requirements for pristine bicycle facilities. Additionally, the Bicycle Facilities feature is intended to improve environmental health as it limits the amount of time spent in the car therefore reducing emissions.

This credit applies to:

Pexels

  • New Construction (1 point)
  • Core and Shell (1 point)
  • Schools (1 point)
  • Data Centers (1 point)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1 point)
  • Hospitality (1 point)
  • Retail (1 point)
  • Healthcare (1 point)

Because there are many different cases for which a bike may be used, several requirements exist for projects regarding the Bicycle Facilities feature. For example, each project type must meet requirements for a “Bicycle Network” as well as requirements for bicycle storage and shower rooms. 

For New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Warehouses and Distribution Centers, and Hospitality projects:

Bicycle Network

Projects must design or locate the project so that a functional entry or bike storage unit is within a 200 yard walking distance or biking distance from a bicycle network that connects to at least one of the following:

  • 10 diverse uses, more if possible
  • a school or employment center, or if the project is 50 percent or more residential
  • a bus stop, rail station, commuter rail station, or ferry terminal

Additionally, all destinations must be within a 3 mile bicycling distance of the project boundary.

Bike Storage and Shower Rooms

Because of the diverse uses for bikes, LEED provides projects with how-to handle three different “cases” titled “Commercial/Institutional Projects”, “Residential Projects”, and Mixed-Use Projects.”

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For Commercial or Institutional Projects

Projects must provide short-term bicycle storage for at least 2.5% of all peak visitors, but no fewer than four storage spaces per building.

Provide long-term bicycle storage for at least 5% of all regular building occupants, but no fewer than four storage spaces per building in addition to the short-term bicycle storage spaces.

Provide at least one on-site shower with changing facility for the first 100 regular building occupants and one additional shower for every 150 regular building occupants thereafter.
For Residential Projects:

Short-term bike storage will be treated the same as if the building were commercial or institutional.

For long-term, bike storage must be available for at least 30% of all building occupants, but no less than one storage space per house/apartment/living unit.

For Mixed-Use Projects:

Short-term and long-term bicycle storage should be treated the same for commercial and institutional or residential parts of the project. It is important to discern what type of project each space is and refer to the appropriate requirements for that project space respectively. 

For School Projects:

Bicycle Network

Projects must design or locate the project so that a functional entry or bike storage unit is within a 200 yard walking distance or biking distance from a bicycle network that connects to at least one of the following:

  • 10 diverse uses, more if possible
  • a school or employment center, or if the project is 50 percent or more residential
  • a bus stop, rail station, commuter rail station, or ferry terminal

Additionally, all destinations must be within a 3 mile bicycling distance of the project boundary.

Bicycle Storage and Shower Rooms

The LEED BD+C Guide PDF states that projects must provide long-term bicycle storage for at least 5% of all regular building occupants (excluding students grade 3 and younger), but no fewer than four storage spaces per building. Long-term storage spaces must be easily accessible to occupants and be within 100 feet (30 meters) walking distance of any main entrance.
Provide at least one on-site shower with changing facility for the first 100 regular building occupants (excluding students) and one additional shower for every 150 regular building occupants (excluding students) thereafter.

For Retail Projects:

Bicycle Network

Projects must design or locate the project so that a functional entry or bike storage unit is within a 200 yard walking distance or biking distance from a bicycle network that connects to at least one of the following:

  • 10 diverse uses, more if possible
  • a school or employment center, or if the project is 50 percent or more residential
  • a bus stop, rail station, commuter rail station, or ferry terminal

Additionally, all destinations must be within a 3 mile bicycling distance of the project boundary.

Bicycle Storage and Shower Rooms

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Provide at least two short-term bicycle storage spaces for every 5,000 square feet but no fewer than two storage spaces per building. Both short-term and long-term bicycle storage must be within 100 feet walking distance of any main functional entrance.

Provide long-term bicycle storage for at least 5% of regular building occupants, but no fewer than two storage spaces per building in addition to the short-term bicycle storage spaces.

Projects need at least one on-site shower with changing facility for the first 100 regular building occupants and one additional shower for every 150 regular building occupants thereafter.

Bicycle storage capacity may not be double-counted: storage that is fully allocated to the occupants of non-project facilities cannot also serve project occupants.

For Healthcare Projects:

Bicycle Network

Projects must design or locate the project so that a functional entry or bike storage unit is within a 200 yard walking distance or biking distance from a bicycle network that connects to at least one of the following:

  • 10 diverse uses, more if possible
  • a school or employment center, or if the project is 50 percent or more residential
  • a bus stop, rail station, commuter rail station, or ferry terminal

Additionally, all destinations must be within a 3 mile bicycling distance of the project boundary.

Bicycle Storage and Shower Rooms

For healthcare there are two potential cases that projects can meet to fulfill the bicycle facilities feature. They are divided into case 1, Commercial/Institutional and case 2, Residential projects.

For Commercial or Institutional Projects 

  • Projects must provide short-term bicycle storage for at least 2.5% of all peak visitors, but no fewer than four storage spaces per building.
  • Provide long-term bicycle storage for at least 5% of all regular building occupants, but no fewer than four storage spaces per building in addition to the short-term bicycle storage spaces.
  • Provide at least one on-site shower with changing facility for the first 100 regular building occupants and one additional shower for every 150 regular building occupants thereafter.

For Residential Projects

For long-term, bike storage must be available for at least 30% of all building occupants, but no less than one storage space per house/apartment/living unit. The 30% all building occupants excludes patients, as they are typically not all in-patients.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit can refer to pages 113-16 of the LEED BD+C Guide PDF for a complete step-by-step how-to explanation.

(7) LEED for Reduced Parking Footprint Feature

The LEED Location and Transportation feature for Reduced Parking Footprint is built into the LT credit in order to ensure that people minimize environmental harm from motorized vehicles. This feature is also intended to reduce our dependence on vehicles, land consumption, and rainwater runoff through minimizing vehicle use.

This credit can be applied to:

  • New Construction (1 point)
  • Core and Shell (1 point)
  • Schools (1 point)
  • Data Centers (1 point)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1 point)
  • Hospitality (1 point)
  • Retail (1 point)
  • Healthcare (1 point)

There are two possible cases for those who would like to fulfill the Reduced Parking Footprint feature. 

PexelsCase 1: Baseline Location
No projects are permitted to exceed the minimum local code for parking capacity. Projects who have not earned points under LT Credit Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses or LT Credit Access to Quality Transit must achieve a 20% reduction from the base ratios.

Case 2: Dense and/or Transit-Served Location

If your project has already earned 1 or more points under either LT Credit Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses or LT Credit Access to Quality Transit, your project must achieve a 40% reduction from the base ratios.

Projects looking to fulfill this credit can refer to pages 113-16 of the LEED BD+C Guide PDF for a complete step-by-step how-to explanation.

(8) LEED for Green Vehicles Feature

The purpose of the Green Vehicles feature is to promote a healthier environment by encouraging the use of eco-friendly hybrid vehicles. This will help to reduce the carbon footprint cars leave behind through alternative modes of transportation.

This credit can be applied to:

  • New Construction (1 point)
  • Core and Shell (1 point)
  • Schools (1 point)
  • Data Centers (1 point)
  • Warehouses and Distribution Centers (1 point)
  • Hospitality (1 point)
  • Retail (1 point)
  • Healthcare (1 point)

​The requirements for fulfilling this feature vary for each type of project.

For New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Hospitality, Retail, Healthcare:

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All projects must designate at least 5 percent of parking for green vehicles. Clearly marked green vehicle parking spaces and parking passes are recommended. If you cannot provide designated green parking spaces, a discounted parking rate by at least 20 percent is sufficient. In addition to preferred parking for green vehicles, meet one of the following two options for alternative-fuel fueling stations:

OPTION 1: Electric Vehicle Charging

Make electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) in 2 percent of all parking spaces used by the project.

According to the LEED BD+C Guide PDF:

The EVSE must:

  • Provide a Level 2 charging capacity (208 – 240 volts) or greater.
  • Comply with the relevant regional or local standard for electrical connectors, such as SAE Surface Vehicle
  • Recommended Practice J1772, SAE Electric Vehicle Conductive Charge Coupler or IEC 62196 of the International
  • Electrotechnical Commission for projects outside the U.S.
  • Be networked or internet addressable and be capable of participating in a demand-response program or time- of-use pricing to encourage off-peak charging. 

OPTION 2: Liquid, Gas, or Battery Facilities

Projects must provide a liquid or gas alternative fuel fueling facilities or a battery switching station capable of refueling a number of vehicles per day equal to at least 2% of all parking spaces.

For Schools:

Many of the same standards for green vehicles carry over from New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Hospitality, Retail and Healthcare projects. Option 1 and Paths 1 and 2 directly mimic the requirements for the previously mentioned project types.

Green Vehicles, WikipediaOPTION 1: Green Passenger Vehicles

All projects must designate at least 5 percent of parking for green vehicles. Clearly marked green vehicle parking spaces and parking passes are recommended. If you cannot provide designated green parking spaces, a discounted parking rate by at least 20 percent is sufficient. In addition to preferred parking for green vehicles, meet one of the following two options for alternative-fuel fueling stations:

Path 1: Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

For schools the same charging station standards apply as would be used for New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Hospitality, Retail and Healthcare projects.

Therefore, the EVSE must:

  • Provide a Level 2 charging capacity (208 – 240 volts) or greater.
  • Comply with the relevant regional or local standard for electrical connectors, such as SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice J1772, SAE Electric Vehicle
  • Conductive Charge Coupler or IEC 62196 of the International Electrotechnical Commission for projects outside the U.S.
  • Be networked or internet addressable and be capable of participating in a demand-response program or time- of-use pricing to encourage off-peak charging.

Path 2: Liquid, Gas, or Battery Facilities

Additionally, the standards for liquid, gas, or battery facilities for electric vehicles carry over from New Construction, Core and Shell, Data Centers, Hospitality, Retail and
Healthcare projects.

Projects must provide a liquid or gas alternative fuel fueling facilities or a battery switching station capable of refueling a number of vehicles per day equal to at least 2% of
all parking spaces.

OPTION 2: Green Buses and School-Owned Vehicles

Projects may choose this option to fulfill the LEED for Green Vehicles feature. In order to meet the requirements for option 2, the BD+C Guide instructs that projects:

Develop and implement a plan for every bus serving the school to meet the following emissions standards within seven years of the building certificate of occupancy:

  • nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions of 0.50 grams or less per brake horsepower-hour; and
  • particulate matter emissions of 0.01 grams or less per brake horsepower-hour.

Emission standards must be met for each bus and not by an average of the entire fleet serving the school.

Develop and implement a plan for 100% of all other (non-bus) vehicles owned or leased to serve the school to be green vehicles. Green vehicles must achieve a minimum
green score of 45 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S).

For Warehouses and Distribution Center Projects:

WikipediaTwo options exist for warehouse and distribution center projects to choose:

OPTION 1: Alternative-Fuel Vehicles (1 point)

Provide at least one yard tractor that is powered by electricity, propane, or natural gas. On-site charging or refueling stations for the vehicles is required Liquid or gas
refueling stations must be separately ventilated or located outdoors.

OPTION 2: Reduced Truck Idling (1 point)

Projects must provide an electrical connection for at least 50% of all dock door locations to limit truck idling at the dock. LEED’s Location and Transportation feature helps new projects pick and choose their sites wisely. Parameters for building on Sensitive Land, Neighborhood Development, High-Priority Sites and managing the Surrounding Density are all covered in this feature and outlined in detail in the LEED BD+C Guide.

Additionally, this feature covers transportation elements such as Access to Quality Transit, Bicycle Facilities and a focus on Reducing our Parking Footprint. By meeting the requirements listed by LEED, new or existing projects can promote an active healthy lifestyle and benefit the environment.  

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